crisis solutions center

Crisis Solutions Center is hiring! Open positions here

Neighborhood advisory committee and good neighbor agreement here

Frequently Asked Questions here

General information sheet here


Overview
Previously, when police and medics were called to intervene when someone was experiencing a behavioral healthcare crisis in the community, the only options they had were to take the person to jail, a hospital emergency department or to do nothing. DESC's Crisis Solutions Center (CSC) provides a more appropriate therapeutic option.

A team of mental health and chemical dependency professionals will help stabilize the current crisis in a voluntary inpatient setting. They will also immediately work to refer participants to long-term assistance and housing, tailored to each person’s needs. As a result, the CSC will reduce overall admissions to jails, hospital emergency departments and psychiatric hospital inpatient units.

The Crisis Solutions Center launched its operations on August 6, 2012. CSC has three components:

  1. The Crisis Diversion Facility (CDF) is a 16-bed state-licensed Residential Treatment Facility. The CDF will only accept eligible individuals in behavioral crisis who are referred by first responders in King County, including law enforcement, Fire Department/Medic One units, Designated Mental Health Professionals and hospital emergency departments social workers. Clients will stay in this program for up to 72 hours, and receive stabilization, evaluation and psychiatric services, mental health and chemical dependency assessments and intensive case management.
  2. The Crisis Diversion Interim Services (CDIS) is a 30-bed "step down" program which admits clients referred directly from the CDF who are homeless, or at risk for homelessness. Clients may stay up to 14 days and will have access to psychiatric services, mental health and chemical dependency assessments and intensive case management.
  3. The Mobile Crisis Team (MCT) is a 15-member team of Mental Health Professionals and Chemical Dependency Professionals. The MCT accepts referrals from police and medics for any individual who are experiencing crisis mental health and/or chemical dependency crisis.

Referral Sources
The Crisis Diversion Facility and Mobile Crisis Team will only accept eligible individuals in behavioral crisis who are referred by first responders in King County, including law enforcement, Fire Department/Medic One units, Designated Mental Health Professionals and hospital emergency departments social workers. Referrals to the Crisis Diversion Interim Services will come only from the Crisis Diversion Facility.

Related Media

Crisis Solutions Center another option for offenders with mental health issues - Renton Reporter.com (September 19, 2012)

Crisis Diversion Facility Now Open in Seattle - Spotlight, The official newsletter of NAMI Greater Seattle (September-October 2012)

DESC Crisis Solutions Center now open in Jackson Place - Central District News (August 13, 2012)

The Crisis Solutions Center - a much better alternative to jail or ER - Seattle City Councilmember Sally Bagshaw news blog (August 6, 2012)

Crisis Solutions Center: Innovative Facility Diverts Mentally Ill and Drug Dependent from Jails and Hospital Emergency Rooms - King County Prosecuting Attorney's Office News (August 2, 2012)

Following a Year of Opposition , Neighborhood Mental Health Center Will Open This Friday - The Stranger (August 1, 2012)

Chinatown ID crisis center an alternative to jail or ER - The Seattle Times (August 1, 2012)

New Mental Health Crisis Facility to Serve King County - KUOW News (August 1, 2012)

Judge rules in DESC's favor on crisis diversion site - Crosscut (January 31, 2012)

Seattle police: what they're doing right with troubled people - Crosscut (January 12, 2012)

Judge Dismisses NIMBY Lawsuit, allows for Neighborhood Mental Health Center - The Stranger (January 10, 2012)

Seattle process: Neighbors diverge on a diversion facility - Crosscut (December 14, 2011)

Mobile Crisis Team to ease conflicts between police, mentally ill - Real Change News (October 12, 2011)

Seattle's New Batmobile - The Stranger (September 22, 2011)

Community's Disapproval of New Crisis Solutions Center - The North American Post (June 8, 2011)

City Issues Permit for Controversial Mental Health Center in Jackson Place - The Stranger (April 7, 2011)

Fear Factor - Real Change News (February 9, 2011)

Alternative for mentally ill in crisis stirs debate - KPLU News (February 4, 2011)

What Are Jackson Place Residents Running From? - The Stranger (February 1, 2011)

Opponents of Jackson Place DESC facility dominate forum - Central District News (February 1, 2011)

Jackson Place group challenges legality of planned DESC facility - Central District News (January 28, 2011)

Group challenges plans for crisis center near Chinatown International District - Seattle Times (January 25, 2011) This article contains an error, stating that the facility will be on "24-hour lockdown". In fact, it is a voluntarily mental health treatment facility with no "lockdown" aspect to it. As outlined in our Neighborhood Safeguards, the program will include several security measures, in both the design of the building and program operations, so that participants do not roam unaccompanied into the neighborhood. However, this will not be an involuntary or locked facility.

New Emergency Program Reaches Jackson Place Neighborhood - The North American Post [Japanese American Community News], (November 17, 2010)

Help for consumers in crisis: New programs provide alternatives to hospital, jail - The Voice Newsletter of NAMI Washington (Fall 2010)

Officials urge residents not to fight planned Crisis Solutions Center - Central District News Blog (November 10, 2010)

Homeless Crisis Center Planned in Jackson Place - Central District News Blog (October 29, 2010)

Seattle Downtown Emergency Service Center adding staff for crisis center - Puget Sound Business Journal (July 30, 2010)

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